Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Increase in Visa fees for international acts Options
bonddm20020000
Posted: Monday, October 10, 2016 10:23:42 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
I assume this must be part of Turnbull's "Jobs and Growth" masterplan?!
Is there anyone in the Liberal Party who doesn't despise the arts?!
http://musicfeeds.com.au/news/new-government-plan-could-stop-fave-acts-touring-australia-industry-body/
skot20_58
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:54:12 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/26/2008
Posts: 999
Points: -1,067
bonddm20020000 wrote:
I assume this must be part of Turnbull's "Jobs and Growth" masterplan?!
Is there anyone in the Liberal Party who doesn't despise the arts?!
http://musicfeeds.com.au/news/new-government-plan-could-stop-fave-acts-touring-australia-industry-body/




I was going to reply to this with basically the same stuff you have typed. Why do people keep voting for them? They are evil.


Dear Skot,
Are you going to be a goose all your life?
regards
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 12:25:24 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/20/2009
Posts: 599
Points: 710


Idiotic and shortsighted policy making on the run
freexone
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 1:17:17 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 5/16/2011
Posts: 226
Points: -31,841
Location: Everywhere and nowhere...
Beware the straight..and narrow minded.
Ideaology gone mad.

(witness Trump)
TheLoneRanger
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 4:59:54 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/19/2008
Posts: 3,858
Points: 9,357
Location: 46* South
Import taxes to protect the livelihoods of Au musicans.

"An artist never really chooses when and where they will play.It is for promoters to make offers.It comes down as to whether tours are financially viable." Quote John Mayall.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbEHzqildp8
bonddm20020000
Posted: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 5:08:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
TheLoneRanger wrote:
Import taxes to protect the livelihoods of Au musicans.

What about Australian musicians employed by overseas acts?
Joe Bonamassa and Janiva Magness ( + probably others) used some local musicians in their bands at Bluesfest this year.If artists like these stop touring here, then the local musos end up with less work.
Liberal Governments have never lifted a finger to assist Australian artists and this is simply another cynical cash grab.
The decision to raise the visas has been overseen by an ex-policeman (Peter Dutton) who I'm sure has extensive knowleddge of the Australian music industry, not!
regards
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 2:52:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/20/2009
Posts: 599
Points: 710
TheLoneRanger wrote:
Import taxes to protect the livelihoods of Au musicans.


Rubbish

Where did you get that information from?

I am a long way from home at present but have just spoken to someone who is well versed on this subject and he and others are greatly concerned about the broader

implications of this proposal, for the tours and festivals etc that bring many people to Aus, and create lots of work for musos, production companies etc, with the obvious flow on effect.


I am told that there will be an article in the age regarding this soon, and apologies if it has already happned.


bonddm20020000
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 5:51:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
TheLoneRanger wrote:
Import taxes to protect the livelihoods of Au musicans.

There are already plenty of festivals with almost exclusively Australian acts.
Sydney Bluesfest has 60 acts on the bill, 59 of whom are local.
Blues on Broadbeach this year had Eric Burdon as their sole international, I think.
"Day on the Green" events regularly have lineups comprised solely of local acts.

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/music/higher-visa-fees-for-touring-artists-could-cripple-the-australian-music-industry-warn-promoters-20161012-gs0e9v.html
mpember
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 9:10:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/16/2008
Posts: 552
Points: -227
The SMH article has the following text:
Quote:
A change in the fee for an application for temporary work in Australia as an entertainer – covering musicians, crew, gymnasts, actors or circus performers – has removed an application fee of $170 and reduced the processing fee from $380 to $275.


This would suggest that the costs for smaller acts may be lower than under the current scheme.

The '300%' and '600%' quotes are from promoters of the larger festivals who tour enough acts that they hit a ceiling that is now being removed. This means they they no longer get a discount for bundling all their acts into one visa payment.

If G'n'R need 80 people to be flown in from overseas, that is their choice. If somone can be found locally to do the same work, they can avoid the visa application all together. If there truly is nobody in Australia capable of peeling Axl's grapes just the way he likes them, can they put in a 457 visa application?

If the $2m+ figure quoted as being owed to Soundgarden are any indication, the acts large enough to require more than 20 people in their touring party may be the same people who are in a position to cover the non-discounted visa fees. Maybe they just need to cut back on their 'throwing hotel TV into swimming pool' budget.

The fluctuations in the AUD would likely have a bigger impact on the costs of touring large international acts than the $275pp visa application fee.
bonddm20020000
Posted: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 11:07:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
mpember wrote:
The SMH article has the following text:
Quote:
A change in the fee for an application for temporary work in Australia as an entertainer – covering musicians, crew, gymnasts, actors or circus performers – has removed an application fee of $170 and reduced the processing fee from $380 to $275.

If the $2m+ figure quoted as being owed to Soundgarden are any indication, the acts large enough to require more than 20 people in their touring party may be the same people who are in a position to cover the non-discounted visa fees.

What about acts like Tedeschi Trucks Band?
bonddm20020000
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 12:30:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
mpember wrote:
The SMH article has the following text:
Quote:
A change in the fee for an application for temporary work in Australia as an entertainer – covering musicians, crew, gymnasts, actors or circus performers – has removed an application fee of $170 and reduced the processing fee from $380 to $275.


This would suggest that the costs for smaller acts may be lower than under the current scheme.

Not if they're touring as part of a large festival lineup.
bonddm20020000
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 1:20:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
Peter Noble is quoted in this article.
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/new-visa-rules-rock-and-outrage-the-music-industry/news-story/d1a285fa73dee9c50ca1614ab04acf46

New visa rules rock and outrage the music industry

The Australian12:00AM October 8, 2016
The music industry has slammed changes to visa applications for international rock acts, warning that the increased charges are likely to lead to higher ticket prices.

Charges for bulk applications may affect stadium acts such as Guns N’ Roses and Bruce Springsteen, and festivals such as Byron Bay’s Bluesfest, with the added cost passed on to music-lovers.

“They will pay by getting less artists on the stage, or higher ticket prices,” said Bluesfest founder Peter Noble, who branded the government’s move a “money grab”.

Veteran promoter Michael Chugg said the federal government, which has introduced the changes, should have “a long hard look” at the effect on the industry.

“The last thing we want to do is increase ticket prices,” Mr Chugg said. “We may have no choice but to put the ticket price up by a few dollars.”

Changes to the temporary ­activity visa framework due to come into effect next month will increase charges for bulk appli­cations by removing a previous discount. Applications will be charged a flat fee of $275 each.

Stadium acts and festivals will be affected because of the large number of visas required: not only for the bands, but for their technical crews, wardrobe and makeup assistants, set builders and support teams.

Bluesfest, which can apply for more than 300 visas a year, would face charges exceeding $55,000.

Next year’s tour by rock titans Guns N’ Roses will involve an ­entourage of more than 80 people. The visa expense would previously have been $7200 but would increase to about $22,000, said Tim McGregor, chief commercial officer of promoter TEG Dainty.

“For a stadium tour like Guns N’ Roses, it arrives in Australia as a finished product, a fully produced show,” Mr McGregor said.

“What do we say to them? ‘Sorry, you can only bring 50 ­people into the country.’

“I don’t understand why you would be penalised for bringing in large tour parties when you get the authentic version of the performance, not some reduced version.”

Industry body Live Performance Australia has written to ­Immigration Minister Peter Dutton to protest against the changes, warning of a reduction in tours and fewer opportunities for Australian support acts.

“These new fees add significantly to the cost of touring Australia, and will act as a major disincentive for international artists to come here compared to ­opportunities in other markets,” LPA chief executive Evelyn Richardson said.

Mr McGregor said tour promoters worked with small margins, and the changes were “extremely punishing” for an ­industry hit by the low Australian dollar.

He said it was “not easy to ­absorb the cost” of the new ­charges, which would likely result in higher ticket prices.

A representative from the ­Department of Immigration and Border Protection said removing the discount for bulk applications provided a “fairer fee structure” for both large and small producers.

Mr Noble said the changes ­indicated a lack of government support for the arts and entertainment sector.

“A country that does not value culture needs to take a good hard look at itself,” he said.
mpember
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 9:35:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/16/2008
Posts: 552
Points: -227
bonddm20020000 wrote:
What about acts like Tedeschi Trucks Band?


Do they have a touring party of more than 30?

I would like to see somebody name (and shame?) a band / artist who will opt not to tour Australia due to the visa application fee costs. Hearing tour promoters and their industry reps complain is not the same as hearing from the acts themselves. Sure, it eats into the profits of the big tours. But if $50,000 is the difference between BF putting on an event or shutting their doors, I suspect they are cutting their margins a bit too close.

With reports that a single appearance by Bob Dylan costs around $250k, the visa fees are a small drop in a very big bucket when it comes to a festival the size of BF or Splendor.
Space5279
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 9:44:08 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 7/18/2010
Posts: 715
Points: 473
Location: Melbourne
Promoter: Hey Gun's and Roses, come to Australia and I will guarentee you $2 million plus in your collective pockets. Oh and by the way, your visas for your entourage will amount to $22,000.

G 'N' R: $22,000???.....no way man. You can stick it!

"...wild Jamaican's from Kingston drinking Irish Moss
Listening to Peter Winston Macintosh..."
regards
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 10:12:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 12/20/2009
Posts: 599
Points: 710
Most of the time the fees are guaranteed up front for all the acts and especially for a mid range festival if bad weather arises they can run very close to the edge, or if tickets sales do not meet expectations.

Falls Byron last year battled, so the word was on the street.

Any additional monetary impost can make things very hard indeed.

GNR are not a good example but that tour will be creating a lot of work for people I know, and the Government should be making it easier for people to create work for others.

Not making it harder.
bonddm20020000
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 10:15:08 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
mpember wrote:
bonddm20020000 wrote:
What about acts like Tedeschi Trucks Band?


Do they have a touring party of more than 30?

I'd be guessing it'd be 20+.
I'd also be tipping that the profit margins for an act that size in Australia are pretty low.
Their sideshows aren't in huge venues.
A mate of mine who is a professional musician told me he can't work out how they crunch the numbers to make it down here!
The Jools Holland Orchestra are another act who would be expensive to tour under the new rules.
Another article below.
http://themusic.com.au/news/all/2016/10/13/promoters-at-loggerheads-over-touring-visa-fee-increases-this-is-just-an-overreaction/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=YDS%20131016&utm_content=YDS%20131016
mpember
Posted: Thursday, October 13, 2016 10:00:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/16/2008
Posts: 552
Points: -227


I agree with Richie McNeill. If the current system was using the higher fees to ofset the discount, it meant that smaller acts were footing the bill for festivals and other large touring parties. It is not surprising that the promoters who are advantaged by the current cap on fees would be the ones making the most noise.

bonddm20020000 wrote:
A mate of mine who is a professional musician told me he can't work out how they crunch the numbers to make it down here!
The Jools Holland Orchestra are another act who would be expensive to tour under the new rules.


Yes. An act with a larger number of people and/or a large support crew will pay a bit more. But it may also mean that some of the smaller bands will think more about coming down under.

Short of removing the fees, it was never goig to be a win/win scenario. The 'winners' may never get media attention and the 'losers' are the ones with the largest megaphones.

As someone who bought tickets to a show which BF touring cancelled, I would think that poor ticket sales have more of an impact than the visa fees. If BF or Chugg can name an artist that turned them down (or was overlooked) as a result of the new fee structure, I'd love to hear it. Otherwise, we have a couple of big promoters making vague threats in an attempt to protect their margins.
bonddm20020000
Posted: Friday, November 04, 2016 3:19:53 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
bonddm20020000
Posted: Thursday, November 17, 2016 4:00:21 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/21/2016
Posts: 505
Points: -4,907
More bad news.We really need more talkback on Australian radio!

http://themusic.com.au/news/all/2016/11/16/abc-set-to-axe-radio-national-music-programs-in-2017/
bucetti1
Posted: Thursday, November 17, 2016 4:10:35 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 10/20/2011
Posts: 1,017
Points: 153
This is truly appalling.
I particularly love The inside Sleeve.
These shows are important and fundamental.
This caps off a shocking fortnight of news.


When they go low-we go high.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

SoClean Theme Created by Jaben Cargman (Tiny Gecko)
Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.8 (NET v2.0) - 3/29/2008
Copyright © 2003-2008 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.
This page was generated in 0.202 seconds.